Sarah Elaine Eaton, Ph.D.






         University of Calgary

May 10, 2017

EDER 603.23 Writing Educational Research (Spring 2017)

I am feeling energized! This spring, I get to teach one of my all-time favourite courses: Writing Educational Research (EDER 603.23). I’ll be working with Master of Education (M.Ed.) students to help them craft a term paper into a manuscript for publication.

Why do I love this course? Because it generates results! Some of the students who take this course really do end up getting their work published in peer-reviewed journals, conference proceedings, books and professional publications. Here are some real-life examples of students who have taken this course with me and have published their work:

There are additional students who have written to me to tell me they have manuscripts in progress. I really love to see authentic, real-world outcomes from student learning and these are some fabulous examples.

Course description

Here is the official description of the course:

This course will focus on examining and developing the skills associated with crafting an academic report and discussion on research data. Topics include genres and purposes of academic writing, as well as venues for presentation and publication. An academic paper is more than a compilation of relevant literature, attending information and a conclusion.

An acceptable paper, whether intended for an academic or a professional audience, and whether a report of findings or a theoretical-philosophical argument, takes a clearly defined idea, situates it in the current literature, and supports it with a well-structured discussion. The principal intentions of this course are to introduce students to the various structures of academic and professional papers and to provide support in their efforts to craft, present and potentially publish their written work.

A traditional approach to writing educational research involves first learning about writing, then learning to write. Learners first study sample texts, analyzing them and then dissecting them, examining their structure, argument and style. The next step often involves producing an original piece of writing that mimics the style, tone and structure of the sample text. The final step is to integrate elements of the student’s own voice and style with elements of the texts they have previously studied. The rationale behind this approach is that the student must first learn what counts as excellent writing by learning about writing. Only then are they prepared to write themselves.

This course takes a non-traditional approach to learning to write about research for scholarly or professional purposes. Students will focus on writing, offering feedback to peers, revising, and incorporating feedback.

Students take on three key roles during this course:

  1. Writer – Crafting an original work intended for sharing in a public forum.
  2. Reviewer – Developing your skills offering substantive and supportive feedback to peers to help them improve their writing so that they, too, are successful in sharing their work in a public forum.
  3. Reviser – Learning to consider and incorporate peer feedback thoughtfully. As scholars and professionals, we recognize that our work is stronger when we incorporate revisions from trusted colleagues whose intention is to help us succeed.

Check out a copy of the course outline here:

EDER_603.23_L09_Eaton_SP2017 – approved___

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Sarah Elaine Eaton, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Werklund School of Education

October 11, 2016

EDER 603.26 L02 Research Methodology in Education II

In the fall of 2016 I am teaching EDER 603.26 Research Methodology in Education II. This is Master’s level research course in the Werklund School of Education offered on campus. Here is a copy of the course outline: eder-603-26-l02_fall2016_eaton

______________________

Sarah Elaine Eaton, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Werklund School of Education

EDER 603.21 Research Methodology in Education (Fall 2016)

Filed under: Werklund School of Education — saraheaton @ 11:56 am

In the fall of 2016 I am teaching EDER 603.21 Research Methodology in Education. This is a research course in the Master of Education (M.Ed.) program in the Werklund School of Education. This is a fully online course.

Here is a copy of the course outline: Eder-603-21_fall2016_eaton-approved

______________________

Sarah Elaine Eaton, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Werklund School of Education

EDER 692.06 L02 Collaboratory of Practice (Fall 2016

Filed under: Werklund School of Education — saraheaton @ 11:53 am

In the fall of 2016 I am teaching EDER 692.06 L02 Collaboratory of Practice. This is the capstone research project course in the Master of Education (M.Ed.) program in the Werklund School of Education. This is a fully online course.

Here is a copy of the course outline: Eder_692-06_l02_fall2016_eaton-approved-aug-25

______________________

Sarah Elaine Eaton, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Werklund School of Education

May 17, 2016

Designing Synchronous Online Interactions and Discussions

Filed under: Werklund School of Education — saraheaton @ 8:01 am

IDEAS 2016A few weeks ago I co-presented a session at the University of Calgary’s IDEAS 2016 conference. This year the theme was “Designing for Innovation”. My colleagues, Barb Brown and Meadow Schroeder and I presented on how to effectively design synchronous sessions for e-learning.

The three of us are all award-winning educators, and each has her own approach to how we design and deliver real-time sessions via Adobe Connect in our classes. We offered ideas and tips on what we do and how we do it. Our paper has been included in the conference proceedings, which have just been released. Here’s a link to our paper:

Brown, B., Schroeder, M., & Eaton, S.E. (2016, May). Designing Synchronous Online Interactions and Discussions. In M. Takeuchi, A.P. Preciado Babb, & J. Lock. IDEAS 2016: Designing for Innovation Selected Proceedings. Paper presented at IDEAS 2016: Designing for Innovation, Calgary, Canada (pg 51-60). Calgary, Canada: Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1880/51209

January 22, 2016

Authentic Exemplars: Student publications from EDER 603.23 – Writing Educational Research

Filed under: Werklund School of Education — saraheaton @ 9:17 am
Tags:

One of the most rewarding elements of teaching is watching students succeed. In EDER 603.23 -Writing Educational Research, we work with Master of Education students to help them prepare a manuscript that might be suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed conference or journal. Here are some authentic examples of former students of mine who took the leap and chose to submit their work for consideration, with the result being successful publication of their work:

Quinn, E. (2015). Designing a professional learning model to support creativity in teaching and learning. Paper presented at the IDEAS: Designing Responsive Pedagogy. Retrieved from http://prism.ucalgary.ca/bitstream/1880/50852/3/IDEAS%202015%20FINAL.pdf

Becker, S. (2014). A win-win situation: Developing a system of reflection and documentation for a grade 4 arts-infused inquiry. One World in Dialogue, 3(1), 17-27. Retrieved from http://ssc.teachers.ab.ca/SiteCollectionDocuments/OneWorldInDialogue/OneWorldinDialogue_2014Vol3No1/Sandra%20Becker%20Article_OneWorld%20inDialogue2014Vol3No1.pdf

I am thrilled to share their work with you and I look forward to adding the work of more students to this list over time.

___________________________
Sarah Elaine Eaton, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Linguistics, Languages and Cultures
Sessional Instructor, Graduate Programs in Education, Werklund School of Education
Research Associate, Language Research Centre
University of Calgary
2500 University Drive, NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4
seaton (at) ucalgary.ca

January 2, 2016

EDER 603.23 – Writing Educational Research – Winter 2016

 

I am thrilled that I have the opportunity to teach one of my favourite courses again in the Winter semester. Even better, I already know many of the students who are enrolled and I welcome the opportunity to work with this academically strong group again.

Here’s a downloadable .pdf of the course outline: EDER_603.23_L09_Eaton_W2016 (approved)

This term, all the instructors who will teach the course in the Winter semester worked to collaboratively design a common outline for all sections of the course. We will use a common approach to teaching, assignments and due dates.

The objective of the course is to engage students in thinking about publishing their work in a public format. Here is an example from a previous student of mine in this course who published her first refereed conference paper as a direct result of her work in this course:

Quinn, E. (2015). Designing a professional learning model to support creativity in teaching and learning. Paper presented at the IDEAS: Designing Responsive Pedagogy, Calgary, AB. Retrieved from: http://prism.ucalgary.ca/bitstream/1880/50852/3/IDEAS%202015%20FINAL.pdf

I hope that this example inspires students in the Winter semester to seek publication of their own research in a credible (e.g. peer reviewed) format. Now is an exciting time for graduate students who want to work towards sharing work in a published format. There are more opportunities than ever before for graduate students to learn what it takes to have their work published in conference proceedings or journals.

Here’s a quick link if you want to send this post to someone else: EDER 603.23 – Writing Educational Research – Winter 2016 –  http://saraheaton.ucalgaryblogs.ca/2016/01/02/eder-603-23-writ…arch-winter-2016/

July 2, 2015

EDER 669.73 – Language Teaching and Technology (Spring 2015) – Showcase of student work

This post showcases the work of students in EDER 669.73 – Language Teaching and Technology in the spring 2015 semester. The students whose work is featured here have given me permission to share their projects publicly on my blog. I am so proud of the work they have done in an intensive 6-week course. Check out what they have created:

Shannon Ballance – EAL Wiki Learning Module

Holly Portas – Elders & Artifacts: Sharing our Languages and Cultures Through Story

Kim Giese – ESL Together

Johnson Kunnel – Surviving the First Week at Canadian Workplace

Nancy Ogasawara – “Dining Out”: A Webquest for Young EFL Leaners

James MacDonald – iPads – Vocabulary – Content

Nikki Suelzle-Johansen – Write About This App for English as a Second Language High School Students

Julie Raymond – Eportfolios 2015

I will add more projects as I receive permission from students to do so. I am so proud of the work done by all the students in this course and thrilled to share it with you.

Share this post with others using this link: http://saraheaton.ucalgaryblogs.ca/?p=31

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Sarah Elaine Eaton, Ph.D.
Werklund School of Education
University of Calgary
2500 University Drive, NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4
seaton (at) ucalgary.ca

EDER 603.21 – Research Methodology in Education (Summer 2015)

I get to teach another one of my favourite courses this summer. This one has undergone a facelift recently and now, all the instructors who teach it in the summer will use the same texts, themes and assignments. We have collaboratively developed the course outline and learning tasks. Here’s an overview of what we came up with:

Course Description

This first course in educational research methodologies provides the background necessary to make intelligent decisions around the kinds of research questions that might be asked and the sort(s) of insights and answers particular methods can provide.

Extended Description

This introductory course is designed for graduate students in the first year of their cohort-based Master’s of Education programs. It focuses on various issues, methods, and techniques in educational research. The course includes some of the issues and dilemmas that frame the context for contemporary research, as well as a preliminary consideration of research strategies, methods, and techniques in a manner intended to assist participants in selecting research questions, methods, and strategies for further study. Participants will also be encouraged to approach research articles and reports with a critical perspective and develop some skills and techniques for this kind of close reading. In relation to a subsequent course, EDER 692 Collaboratory of Practice, this first course will have a focus on action research in education.

The field of education sits at a point of intersection of many other domains – including neurology, psychology, sociology, anthropology, and the many disciplines represented in various subject area specialties. This positioning compels a particular sort of methodological breadth across all programs in education. For that reason, it is not the purpose of the course to develop extensive technical (operational) competence in any particular method of research. Rather, the broader aim is to support an initial understanding of the nature and purpose of various approaches – all of which are useful in understanding educational phenomena, though they may appear to differ substantially.

Over the past 50 years, there has been a proliferation of theories and associated research methodologies in the field of education. A principal aim of the course is to nurture a sort of ‘methodological connoisseurship’ – by interrogating the distinctions and commitments that are associated with various approaches to inquiry rather than by championing specific emphases and approaches. To achieve this end, we should aim for a radical departure from traditional research methods courses that focus on clusters of specific methodologies. The emphasis here will be on the decisions, attitudes, and commitments that take one to a particular approach and that compel certain methods.

The guiding question or attitude is not “How is this perspective or methodology different or wrong?” – which is deemed unproductive as every frame can be critiqued. The orientation is more toward “How is this perspective or methodology right?” To that end, among the simultaneous considerations are: What is the focus (the subject, object, phenomenon, unit of analysis) of interest? Does it change? If so, at what pace? Is it self-transformative and do other agents or phenomena (e.g., educators and researchers) participate in its change?

Course Objectives

  1. To review the range of purposes for, and products of, educational research – including the gathering of empirical data, the application of theory, the generation of theory, and the critique of theory.
  2. To establish a basic literacy in research methodologies. Participants should be able to offer preliminary definitions of principal approaches to research in education and to distinguish among them according to phenomena examined, theoretical commitments, and relevance to their own research interests.
  3. To appreciate that methodological breadth is better articulated in terms of complementarities than conflicts, recognizing that methods are developed in conversation with the phenomena they are intended to ‘investigate.’ As such, any comparison of methods demands a range of questions, including queries on what is being studied, who is doing the studying, the purposes of study, the time frames of the inquiry, etc. Details around technical differences among methods are at best secondary considerations in this conversation.
  4. To interrogate the personal pre-judgments and methodological positionings that frame one’s questions, orient one’s selection of techniques, influence the details one notices, and affect the inferences one draws.
  5. To introduce participants to the issues and challenges of conducting ethical research.

Learner Outcomes

Throughout the course of study students will be able to:

  • Identify viable and interesting research questions and ideas, both in their own potential research endeavours and in the work of published academics (LT1, LT2, LT3)
  • Identify, compare and critique a variety of educational research methodologies based on their primary assumptions and methods (LT1, LT2)
  • Evaluate the relevance of educational research methodologies with special consideration being given to stated research questions and the knowledge being sought (LT1, LT2, LT3)
  • Differentiate between the central tenets of qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis strategies with special consideration being given to the strengths, weaknesses and relevance of each in education (LT1, LT2, LT3)
  • Assess the validity of a variety of research methods, both qualitative and quantitative, commonly used in education (LT1, LT2, LT3)
  • Examine and interrogate the relationships between research questions, research methods and interpretation of findings in educational studies (LT1, LT2, LT3)
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of ethical considerations in educational research, particularly with regard to the use of human participants (LT2)
  • Formulate and evaluate their own preliminary research questions in response to both their research interests and professional context. (LT3)
  • Understand how action research applies to educational settings and contexts (LT1, LT3)

Here’s a link to the full course outline: EDER 603 21 Summer 2015 – Eaton approved

___________________________
Sarah Elaine Eaton, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Linguistics, Languages and Cultures
Sessional Instructor, Graduate Programs in Education, Werklund School of Education
Research Associate, Language Research Centre
University of Calgary
2500 University Drive, NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4
seaton (at) ucalgary.ca

June 30, 2015

A Review of the Literature on Rural and Remote Pre-Service Teacher Preparation With a Focus on Blended and E-Learning Models

A Review of the Literature on Rural and Remote Pre-Service Teacher Preparation With a Focus on Blended and E-Learning ModelsOver the past several months I have been working with a team in the Werklund School of Education at the University of Calgary to investigate the benefits and challenges of a blended pre-service teacher education program. We did an extensive survey of recent literature and our work has been archived on the U of C’s digital space.

We are excited to share the results of our work. You can check it out here:

Eaton, S. E., Dressler, R., Gereluk, D. & Becker, S. (2015). A review of the literature on rural and remote pre-service teacher preparation with a focus on blended and e-learning models. Calgary: University of Calgary. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1880/50497

___________________________

Sarah Elaine Eaton, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Linguistics, Languages and Cultures
Sessional Instructor, Graduate Programs in Education, Werklund School of Education
Research Associate, Language Research Centre
University of Calgary
2500 University Drive, NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4
seaton (at) ucalgary.ca
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