Sarah Elaine Eaton, Ph.D.






         University of Calgary

May 10, 2017

EDER 603.23 Writing Educational Research (Spring 2017)

I am feeling energized! This spring, I get to teach one of my all-time favourite courses: Writing Educational Research (EDER 603.23). I’ll be working with Master of Education (M.Ed.) students to help them craft a term paper into a manuscript for publication.

Why do I love this course? Because it generates results! Some of the students who take this course really do end up getting their work published in peer-reviewed journals, conference proceedings, books and professional publications. Here are some real-life examples of students who have taken this course with me and have published their work:

There are additional students who have written to me to tell me they have manuscripts in progress. I really love to see authentic, real-world outcomes from student learning and these are some fabulous examples.

Course description

Here is the official description of the course:

This course will focus on examining and developing the skills associated with crafting an academic report and discussion on research data. Topics include genres and purposes of academic writing, as well as venues for presentation and publication. An academic paper is more than a compilation of relevant literature, attending information and a conclusion.

An acceptable paper, whether intended for an academic or a professional audience, and whether a report of findings or a theoretical-philosophical argument, takes a clearly defined idea, situates it in the current literature, and supports it with a well-structured discussion. The principal intentions of this course are to introduce students to the various structures of academic and professional papers and to provide support in their efforts to craft, present and potentially publish their written work.

A traditional approach to writing educational research involves first learning about writing, then learning to write. Learners first study sample texts, analyzing them and then dissecting them, examining their structure, argument and style. The next step often involves producing an original piece of writing that mimics the style, tone and structure of the sample text. The final step is to integrate elements of the student’s own voice and style with elements of the texts they have previously studied. The rationale behind this approach is that the student must first learn what counts as excellent writing by learning about writing. Only then are they prepared to write themselves.

This course takes a non-traditional approach to learning to write about research for scholarly or professional purposes. Students will focus on writing, offering feedback to peers, revising, and incorporating feedback.

Students take on three key roles during this course:

  1. Writer – Crafting an original work intended for sharing in a public forum.
  2. Reviewer – Developing your skills offering substantive and supportive feedback to peers to help them improve their writing so that they, too, are successful in sharing their work in a public forum.
  3. Reviser – Learning to consider and incorporate peer feedback thoughtfully. As scholars and professionals, we recognize that our work is stronger when we incorporate revisions from trusted colleagues whose intention is to help us succeed.

Check out a copy of the course outline here:

EDER_603.23_L09_Eaton_SP2017 – approved___

___________________

Sarah Elaine Eaton, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Werklund School of Education

January 22, 2016

Authentic Exemplars: Student publications from EDER 603.23 – Writing Educational Research

Filed under: Werklund School of Education — saraheaton @ 9:17 am
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One of the most rewarding elements of teaching is watching students succeed. In EDER 603.23 -Writing Educational Research, we work with Master of Education students to help them prepare a manuscript that might be suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed conference or journal. Here are some authentic examples of former students of mine who took the leap and chose to submit their work for consideration, with the result being successful publication of their work:

Quinn, E. (2015). Designing a professional learning model to support creativity in teaching and learning. Paper presented at the IDEAS: Designing Responsive Pedagogy. Retrieved from http://prism.ucalgary.ca/bitstream/1880/50852/3/IDEAS%202015%20FINAL.pdf

Becker, S. (2014). A win-win situation: Developing a system of reflection and documentation for a grade 4 arts-infused inquiry. One World in Dialogue, 3(1), 17-27. Retrieved from http://ssc.teachers.ab.ca/SiteCollectionDocuments/OneWorldInDialogue/OneWorldinDialogue_2014Vol3No1/Sandra%20Becker%20Article_OneWorld%20inDialogue2014Vol3No1.pdf

I am thrilled to share their work with you and I look forward to adding the work of more students to this list over time.

___________________________
Sarah Elaine Eaton, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Linguistics, Languages and Cultures
Sessional Instructor, Graduate Programs in Education, Werklund School of Education
Research Associate, Language Research Centre
University of Calgary
2500 University Drive, NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4
seaton (at) ucalgary.ca

January 2, 2016

EDER 603.23 – Writing Educational Research – Winter 2016

 

I am thrilled that I have the opportunity to teach one of my favourite courses again in the Winter semester. Even better, I already know many of the students who are enrolled and I welcome the opportunity to work with this academically strong group again.

Here’s a downloadable .pdf of the course outline: EDER_603.23_L09_Eaton_W2016 (approved)

This term, all the instructors who will teach the course in the Winter semester worked to collaboratively design a common outline for all sections of the course. We will use a common approach to teaching, assignments and due dates.

The objective of the course is to engage students in thinking about publishing their work in a public format. Here is an example from a previous student of mine in this course who published her first refereed conference paper as a direct result of her work in this course:

Quinn, E. (2015). Designing a professional learning model to support creativity in teaching and learning. Paper presented at the IDEAS: Designing Responsive Pedagogy, Calgary, AB. Retrieved from: http://prism.ucalgary.ca/bitstream/1880/50852/3/IDEAS%202015%20FINAL.pdf

I hope that this example inspires students in the Winter semester to seek publication of their own research in a credible (e.g. peer reviewed) format. Now is an exciting time for graduate students who want to work towards sharing work in a published format. There are more opportunities than ever before for graduate students to learn what it takes to have their work published in conference proceedings or journals.

Here’s a quick link if you want to send this post to someone else: EDER 603.23 – Writing Educational Research – Winter 2016 –  http://saraheaton.ucalgaryblogs.ca/2016/01/02/eder-603-23-writ…arch-winter-2016/

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